Colorado Gives Day ends in

Alternatives to Violence

ATV provides services to any victim of a violent crime without discrimination. Assistance is available on a 24/7 basis and is delivered without cost to any victims and their families.

Learn More About This Non-Profit
Days Left To Donate
0
0
0 donations
$0
of
$0
collected
Start a movement
Want to do more for your favorite charity? We've made it easy for you to raise money by creating a personalized fundraising page.
Start a fundraiser Current fundraisers (0)

Transitional Housing Program

Class

Housing 

Beneficiaries

Adults
Children and Youth (infants - 19 years)
Children birth to age 3
Crime/ Abuse Victims
Families

Description

For victims of domestic violence seeking significant life change, ATV offers an opportunity to achieve life-changing violence free living and self-sufficiency for themselves and their children, through therapy, case management, educational groups, and temporary safe housing for up to one year.

Photos

Evidence of Program's Success

We have had many successful victims of domestic violence leave our transitional housing program stronger, more independent and empowered to leave the world of dependency on another by giving them the tools to learn to survive on their own determined to break the cycle of violence by not perpetuating the reliance on others. "ATV's services allowed me to leave the violence and start a new life with my daughter. Our world is now safe and I am becoming more self-sufficient every day. Thank you for everything!" (Client 487).

ATV SafeHouse

Class

Housing 

Beneficiaries

Adults
Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)
Children birth to age 3
Crime/ Abuse Victims
Adolescents/Youth (13-19 years)

Description

The SafeHouse is a program of ATV which provides safe housing for up to 6 weeks. During that time each guest is provided with basic needs, access to counseling, court advocacy, orders of protection, and comprehensive case management. This facility will house up to 22 people, 3 children in cribs, and provide security from their abuser so that they may regain some stability.

Photos

Evidence of Program's Success

The SafeHouse opened in October 2016 and has been operating at full capacity every month. Clients are now able to work towards obtaining their own, independent, housing or relocate to where they are safe with other family members. With the support of ATV's services in case management, therapy, advocacy, court assistance, financial education and other services victims of violent crimes can rebuild their lives and become self-sufficient members of the community free of violence. "I am very blessed to have been able to come to a place that helped me escape the violence and get stronger. Thank you and all of the staff for helping us so much." (Client 862).

Victims Services

Class

Human Services 

Beneficiaries

Crime/ Abuse Victims

Description

All services provided to victims of violence receive supportive services. Alternatives to Violence educates and empowers victims, survivors, and the community to break the cycle of violence. This community organization began 1982 as Alternatives for Battered Women in the basement of a local church; offering support to a female group of victims of domestic violence. During the first year 10 victims and their children escaped abuse and violence inflicted by a family member. In 1989 the Board of Directors legally changed the agency's name to Alternatives to Violence, Inc. (ATV) to accommodate the needs of all victims-adult women,men & elderly (18-60+), children (3-12), adolescents (12-18), every income level, every race/ethnicity and gender orientation with discrimination. As a dual agency ATV serves victims and witnesses of assault (with domestic violence enhancer), sexual assault, stalking, harassment, restraining order violations with victim assistance 24/4 & clinical services.

Alternatives to Violence responds to victims of crime needing emergency/crisis services 24/7, 365 days per year. Victim Assistance Services are critical to the survival and safety of primary and secondary victims of crime and the Loveland Police Department (LPD) needs victim's advocates. ATV supports LPD as their Crisis Intervention Team (CIT). Our Volunteer Coordinator trains volunteer victim's advocates to intervene with immediate assistance - emotional support, safety planning, community resources, Victim's Rights, and emergency services to meet basic survival needs with food, shelter, clothing, and transportation.

For us to keep victims assistance services sustainable, volunteer advocates receive 42-hours of training from staff during one of the two trainings each year. Our trained volunteers enables provide the 24/7 crisis intervention services whenever needed. Victim's advocate training teaches crisis intervention services, emergency response, identification of immediate needs for all victims, community resources and Victim's Rights. Victim's and court advocates learn how to help victims in crisis. Not all victims request an advocate immediately following the violent incident; some of them wait for days, months, even years before seeking services. These victims contact Alternatives to Violence through the 24-hour hotline; advocates support them, and the Victim & Triage Coordinator guides them from crisis through the intake process and into ATV's services.

Victims of violent crimes also need assistance to understand Victim's Rights, filing for Victim Compensation, applying for Restraining Orders, applying for public assistance; they need education about the court system and frequently request accompaniment to court. Volunteer Coordinator identifies a trained court advocate to assist with civil legal services for divorce/custody, immigration & collateral needs.

Without shelter from abuse, the victim and his/her children may return to a violent home life. ATV currently responds with emergency shelter in our SafeHouse program and long-term housing services of up to one year in our transitional housing program. Upon enrollment, transitional housing residents also receive case management to increase their personal capacity for self-sufficiency and sustainability.

Photos

Evidence of Program's Success

In 2017, over 700 victims benefited from over 4,000 unique services. This means more than 700 men, women, and children were able to escape from abusive or violent situations, turning from a life of fear and restraint and instead to a future of an independent, self-sufficient life filled with hope and opportunity.
Alternatives to Violence's approach to evaluation is a full learning cycle beginning with assessing community needs, receiving client input and knowledge level from surveys and quizzes, and continuously analyzing the results to feed into and adapt future programming. The needs assessment translates into the development of services and programs designed specifically to meet those needs. The program development includes identifying evaluation tools that accurately collect and record data used to substantiate the value of the services and programs to the clients and the agency. Each evaluation tool has minimum expectations for moving clients from victims to survivors; from dependency to self-sufficiency. Measuring the impact that services have on the lives of our clients drives our programming. We make adjustments, modifications, and allowances when deemed necessary to assure that we are making an impact and not simply counting the number of services offered.
We have had several people that have shown significant improvement as a result of the support they have received from ATV.
"ATV's advocates and staff were super supportive and compassionate. They made me feel welcome and safe and addressed my immediate and longer-term needs so that I could escape the violence. I encourage ATV to continue its mission and life changing services in the community." (Client 942).

Key aspects of this profile information have been reviewed by Community First Foundation staff. Each organization is exclusively responsible for the content that appears on the profile page. Community First Foundation offers general guidance as to the purpose of each area but does not require or encourage charities to include anything in particular in each section.