Think Humanity, Inc.

Protecting children from malaria, providing them with clean water and education and supporting community development are the most concrete ways we can lift others out of poverty and to give them hope. Please consider giving them this chance.

Learn More About This Non-Profit
Start a movement
Want to do more for your favorite charity? We've made it easy for you to raise money by creating a personalized fundraising page.
Start a fundraiser Current fundraisers (0)

Health Care

Class

Health Care 

Beneficiaries

General population
Immigrants, Newcomers, Refuges

Description

Think Humanity Health Centre Kyangwali provides general health care to refugees and overlooked communities. The clinic is just 7km outside of Kyangwali Refugee Camp in western Uganda. We have Women's Health Days and give children immunizations.

Photos

Evidence of Program's Success

Incidences of malaria has reduced in the area because we have given out mosquito nets. So we had seen more patients with malaria in the past but now it has reduced.

Socio-economic Development

Class

Community Development 

Beneficiaries

Blacks
Females
Immigrants/Newcomers/Refugees
Poor/Economically Disadvantaged

Description

Think Humanity has worked in partnership with New Life In Africa (LiA) since 2009.

New Life in Africa is a group of women from the Acholi Quarter Camp for Internally Displaced Persons (IDP) in Kireka, Uganda.

Kireka is a suburb just outside Kampala where there are more than 3,000 families who were displaced by war by rebel leader, Joseph Kony. The Acholi women are from Northern Uganda and South Sudan.

In 2009 Think Humanity began by purchasing jewelry made from recycled paper. We continue to buy their products which will help them to earn a family income and to provide food-aid and education for their children.

Photos

Evidence of Program's Success

Selling their products helps these women to feed and education their children. Education helps to eliminate the cycle of poverty. Also these women have learned skills which gives them a future.
When we sell products here for them, we send the money back in different forms. We have been able to provide this entire community with mosquito nets twice over the past eight years. This prevents malaria which also keeps children and women from school and working.
We have also been a part of their transitioning back to northern Uganda where they originated before the Joseph Kony War.
"There is this invisible dividend in the fair trade world...it's hope, pride and dignity, because people are solving their own problems through fair trade." - CEO Fair Trade USA

Think Humanity Girls' Hostel

Class

Education 

Beneficiaries

Blacks
Female Youth/Adolescents (14 - 19 years)
Females
Immigrants/Newcomers/Refugees
Poor/Economically Disadvantaged

Description

The Think Humanity Girls' Hostel (THGH) Program aims to empower and educate young women to create a better future for themselves and their communities.

Girls' Hostel Mission: Create sustainable educational development opportunities for the girls in the developing world to break the cycle of poverty.

Our Vision: To empower girls and children with education and basic training skills in life, social entrepreneurship with leadership and promote the girls' education.

Our Motto: Patience pains, but later pays. We believe in small actions that lead to bigger changes. (We provide a positive change for communities in Africa)

Our Story: The hostel officially began in February 2012, bringing 30 young women from underdeveloped villages and the Kyangwali Refugee Camp in Uganda to their new home in Hoima, Uganda. The girls originally come from many different areas, including Rwanda, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Sudan and from different areas in Uganda. These children were victims of war or displacement and many had been orphaned.

What we've done: Today the girls live safely together as sisters under the care of our Think Humanity directors, a matron, assistant matron, cook and a guard.

In addition to educating the girls, Think Humanity holds an annual Think Humanity Girls' Leadership Summit. We provide programs in health education and invite guests to teach our girls new skills. We want the Think Humanity girls to have the accompanying skills to truly be catalysts for change.

Why we invest in teen girl education: Thirty-one million girls of primary school age are not enrolled in school. The picture is different for girls and boys. By the time they reach secondary school only 84 girls per 100 boys are attending.

Why do girls drop out? Forced child marriages, schools fees, sexual violence and lack of sanitary facilities and resources.

However, If we can keep girls in school beyond grade seven, they are more likely to marry four years later, less likely to die in pregnancy/childbirth, have an average of 2.2 fewer children, have healthier children and more likely to send their children to school.

Photos

Evidence of Program's Success

We remain with 90 percent of the same girls that we started with in 2012. They continue to go to school and have not become victims of early marriages nor have they had children. They remain focussed on education and want to make a positive impact in their communities and to make a better future for themselves and their future families in Africa.

Bed Nets 4 Life

Class

Health Care 

Beneficiaries

Blacks
General Public
Immigrants/Newcomers/Refugees
Poor/Economically Disadvantaged

Description

Think Humanity freely gives bed nets to refugees and people from isolated and underdeveloped villages in western Uganda. The people we serve are from various countries; Uganda, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Rwanda, Sudan and locations where people have been forced to leave their country due to war.

Photos

Evidence of Program's Success

Survey results show that the average annualized malaria incidences have reduced by up to 96 percent in areas where we have given out mosquito nets.

Water is Life

Class

Health Care 

Beneficiaries

Blacks
Families
General Public/Unspecified
Immigrants/Newcomers/Refugees

Description

People in the refugee camps and underdeveloped rural communities need access to clean water sources. Women and children make their daily walk to fetch polluted water in containers weighing up to 40 pounds.

Time spent walking and resulting diseases keep them from school, work and taking care of their families. While some may boil the water, many thirsty and unknowing children and adults simply drink water directly from open swamps, which can result in diseases such as typhoid, cholera and worm parasites.

The good news is that we are changing all this by providing wells. The wells we are constructing are located in the villages where water is most needed.

Photos

Evidence of Program's Success

People spend less time fetching water and less time boiling dirty water. Water-borne diseases are prevented, which saves money and time.

Key aspects of this profile information have been reviewed by Community First Foundation staff. Each organization is exclusively responsible for the content that appears on the profile page. Community First Foundation offers general guidance as to the purpose of each area but does not require or encourage charities to include anything in particular in each section.