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MaxFund Animal Adoption Center

Please consider donating to MaxFund, where animals are never sorted into categories such as "adoptable" and "not adoptable". Every animal we receive into our care is offered treatment, housing and love until a suitable forever family is found.

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Disaster Relief Program

Class

Animal-Related 

Beneficiaries

Adults
Animals
Families
Homeless

Description

Transporting animals out of disaster areas, such as Houston, Puerto Rico, Kosovo, and any other area deemed needed.

Photos

Evidence of Program's Success

Multiple successful animal adoptions, post medical treatment.

Maxfund Foster Program

Class

Animal-Related 

Beneficiaries

General Public/Unspecified

Description

MaxFund is looking for foster parents willing to foster animals in need of a safe, caring environment in which to reach their full loving potential. Animals in our loving foster homes are much easier to adopt because they heal more quickly from any existing injuries or medical procedures and don't suffer from some of the more common issues found in shelter animals: obesity, depression, anxiety, fear, or other health issues.

For approved foster parents, MaxFund will provide on-going access to the Foster Coordinators andor Veterinary Technicians to answer any health or behavior related questions, vaccines, medications, collar and tags, prescription food, and veterinary care at the MaxFund Wellness Center.

Fostering is a very rewarding experience and allows animals to be in a more comfortable environment before they find their forever home.

If you can help, please e mail to fostering@maxfund.org, or call the shelter to get started at 303-595-4917.

Photos

Evidence of Program's Success

In some cases our foster placements are long term, but 100% of our foster animals are eventually adopted to a forever loving home! Many times the foster parent will become attached and adopt the animal themselves! the foster program teaches the animals to love and trust again.

Maxfund Volunteer Program

Class

Animal-Related 

Beneficiaries

General Public

Description

MaxFund relies on its volunteers to fill many of the needs at the shelter, and the volunteer program is extremely flexible and rewarding! No matter what your interest in helping MaxFund, there are likely many things you can do!

Areas of volunteer opportunity include:
- Animal Care
- Housekeeping
- Special Events, Mobile Adoptions, and Fundraising
- Lobby Greeting and Animal Adoptions

In order to volunteer at the shelter for ANY of the volunteer positions listed, you must first be accepted as a volunteer and go through a volunteer orientation. Once volunteers have gone through an orientation, they can do just about anything at the shelter, based on whatever interests you have. For more information on getting started as a volunteer, and to download a volunteer application, please visit www.maxfund.org, or e mail Chelsea Manschot at chelsea@maxfundvolunteers.org.

Photos

Evidence of Program's Success

When you walk into MaxFund, it is clear that the volunteers are valued and appreciated. At any given time there are more volunteers than staff members who are willing to walk dogs, spend time with cats, help feed and clean, do dishes, or catch up on laundry. Together we keep the shelter clean and the animals happy!

Pet Food Supply Program

Class

Animal-Related 

Beneficiaries

General Public/Unspecified

Description

For those people struggling in this economy and having difficulty supplying food to their cats and dogs, MaxFund is here to help. MaxFund offers a food giveaway program for individuals on a low income. Once a month you can come in for a free bag of cat food or dog food for your family pet. Proof of income and state identification are required to enroll, and there are no special requests. MaxFund runs on donations only, so what there is extra of is what we can provide.

Photos

Evidence of Program's Success

We have people who return to pick up food, and people return after they are on their feet and thank us, sometimes even donating a few dollars.

Various other programs

Class

Animal-Related 

Beneficiaries

Description

Hospice Program for aging animals
Therapy program visiting nursing homes and hospitals
Pet Pals
Sponsorship program for cats and dogs

Photos

Evidence of Program's Success

Pet Talk: Hospice fosters offer dogs, cats a peaceful death

By Sharon L. Peters, Special for USA TODAY

The old dog obviously didn't have long. Thin and scarred-up, he'd clearly had a rough go of it for at least part of his life, and had been fending for himself for at least a little while. And now he had inoperable prostate cancer, common in dogs that, like him, haven't been neutered.

But he was cheerful and affable and seemed to take great joy from even the smallest things. The folks at MaxFund, a no-kill shelter in Denver where he'd landed, felt he had some good days yet to be lived.

So the sweet-natured labshepherd mix they'd named Copper went home with Tami Tanoue and Roger McKenzie.

And for two sunny months he lived the life he deserved. He settled in with the couple's other pets, adapting quickly to the various rhythms and routines of the household. His big tail was a constant-motion metronome, thrubbing against the wall whenever a human approached, flinging everything at big-dog height to the nether reaches of the room (his nickname became Slappy because of all that tail action). He took long walks around the neighborhood and snacked on grilled steak.

And then Copper died.

It was pretty much the same story with Missy, the emaciated old Pomeranian mix found in someone's window well. She was deaf and nearly blind, probably from a brain tumor, but she took great comfort in being wrapped in a blanket and held on a lap, so Tanoue and McKenzie took her home, and that's what they gave her for the final weeks of her life.

And then there was Roger the cat, dumped with a vet when he was 14 after he'd been missing the litter box. Turns out he had cancer. He lived his final five weeks with the couple, well-fed and taking long naps in the sunshine.

The couple is among a devoted corps of MaxFund "hospice fosters," about 15 in all, who provide end-of-life love and care to terminally ill animals ditched by their owners.

Only a tiny fraction of the nation's shelters have such programs. The meds and care such animals need to stay content and pain-free cost plenty. And there are millions of healthy animals requiring shelters' attention. Moreover, hospice fostering isn't the kind of work every volunteer feels able to take on. It's tough enough to foster a litter of puppies, becoming attached, knowing they'll be gone soon. But hospice fosters know there will be no happy-ending adoption to mark the end of their time with an animal.

"Your consolation when you lose him," says Tanoue, "is you gave him the best you could."

The pain of loss is not insignificant - she still gets a little teary when speaking of Copper, a dog she knew for only a few weeks before he died more than two years ago. But "the opportunity to get to know another animal, even if only for a little while, is a wonderful gift," she says.

And there's the truth that helps such people through the sad moments: That old dog or cat was not scared or alone. Whatever else had happened in its life up until then, including abandonment by an owner without the compassion or soul or guts to be there until the end, is erased or at least overwritten by period of love and a peaceful parting.

Tanoue, a lawyer, and her writer husband don't spend even one second thinking about the people who put their pets into the fix that resulted in their landing at the Tanoue-McKenzie home.
"When you volunteer at a shelter, it's easy to become cynical about people," she acknowledges. "But focusing on how the animal got there is unproductive."

You just do what you can to make up for the misdeeds of others.
Oddly, until just a few years ago, Tanoue had never had a pet. Not growing up; not as a young adult. She and McKenzie adopted their first -from MaxFund - in 2004, and things just progressed from there. Now their pets number four - three dogs and one cat - and they've provided temporary foster care to a dozen or so animals in need of a temporary safe haven before adoption, as well as to the three terminally ill animals.

Tanoue shrugs off comments about the selflessness it must take to gird oneself so a dog or cat can live its final days in peace. "There are so many wonderful volunteers who do so very much," she says.
Yes, that is true. And the very notion of categorizing the various aspects of animal volunteerism into some sort of hierarchical ladder of greater or lesser contributions is horrid. Still, when you think about a dog like Copper, who but for the grace of an extraordinary couple would have spent his final hours alone and confused in a strange place, well, it seems a little like there are angels here on earth.

Copper got a final summer of happiness. He took long walks, ate boiled chicken and lay on Tanoue's feet every night while the rest of the pets clustered around. When he died it was at the place he'd known as home, with the people who loved him holding his head and telling him so.

MaxFund Outreach Program

Class

Animal-Related 

Beneficiaries

Description

Our mobile unit travels the I-25 corridor from TrinidadAlamosa to Weld County spaying and neutering animals in rural communities. MaxFund has always believed in spaying and neutering. From the beginning in 1988 we made it one of our missions. As we grew, so did the problem of pet over-population.

In 1995, we were receiving calls requesting that we expand the program. We began performing spayneuters in fire stations and at community centers; not only locally but in rural communities. We are sometimes asked to come to trailer parks where cats have been left; our last project included 80 cats. We also helped when Lowry AFB closed. We trapped, spayedneutered and found homes for those cats.

We had humble beginnings indeed and started with an old converted Snap-on-tool truck. Our driver took us to rural areas, trailer parks, shelters just surviving and neighborhoods wanting help. We even go to the sheriff's department in Weld County to help with spayingneutering and vaccinations. We resorted sometimes to using kitchen tables for surgery. We knew the need and had to address it, so we started a capital campaign.

We researched basic mobile units to start as we had grown out of our old van. We found the van types were too expensive, so we opted for a trailer. Ron and Nancy Soule were the first to donate enough funds to almost cover the cost of the trailer. Essentially, they were the ones who gave us a base to start the program. The Soule family still gives us a grant each year as the base of our SN program. We were fortunate with many blessings as money continued to come in. With that we bought a used 1995 truck.

We are proud of the fact that both the truck and trailer are still in operation today. Our mobile unit alone spays and neuter about 1000 animals a year in the rural area. Dr. Beth Watts is our veterinarian and sets up the clinics. She generally does 20 animals a day and the clinics go from 1 to 3 days.

In today's economic times it is important that people know that they have a resource that can help the health of their pet. As we travel in the rural areas, we find that it is difficult sometimes for those individuals to take care of themselves, much less for their animals. This program makes a huge difference in saving lives of the animals, giving peace of mind to communities and helping people with their pets.

Photos

Evidence of Program's Success

Letter From:
Weld County Sheriff's Office Animal Control Unit
August 23, 2011

The Weld County Sheriff's Office has been working with the MaxFund since the spring of 2002, offering low cost or in some cases no cost spayneuter and vaccination clinics in low income areas of Weld County. Since then we estimate that close to 450 animals have been spayed or neutered and close to 850 have been vaccinated. Each year we average two clinics, one in the spring in the southern part of the county and one in the fall in the northern part of the county. These clinics are such a success that we often times have to hold additional clinics to make up for the overflow appointments.

The image of the Sheriff's Office and Animal Control has vastly improved since starting this program. Our community relations have improved and we are no longer viewed as just "The Dog Catcher", and the communities have begun to feel that we care about them and what happens to their animals. Without the help from the MaxFund, this would not be possible.

The Weld County Sheriff's Office Animal Control would like to be able to continue their relationship with the MaxFund, and provide more clinics and services to the residents of Weld County in the future.

Sincerely,
Gary Schwartz
Weld County Sheriff's Office
Animal Control Unit

Adoption Program

Class

Animal-Related 

Beneficiaries

Description

Rescue is challenging, heartbreaking, rewarding and full of miracles. All of that usually takes place on a daily basis.

MaxFund is special because we truly give the time needed to see those miracles take place. It can be costly, but that is what we do. Some do not get it because "there are so many to be saved". This is true, but once they are with MaxFund that is our pledge to them. A chance at life is what they are given.

Other times it is not cost but just time.
Time is what the animals have at MaxFund.
Time for love, care, trust and hope.
Again a chance for the life they deserve.

They are not "throw-aways" they are not "too old" or "too sick", they are special. They are not a number, they are not a statistic. They are MaxFund animals.

Photos

Evidence of Program's Success

House of Representatives
Washington, D.C. 20515

MaxFund
1025 Galapago Street
Denver, CO 80204

Dear Friends,

I wanted to congratulate you on receiving Best Place To Find Fido's Successor in Westword: Best of Denver, 2010. This recognition is well deserved and one in which you should take great pride.

I wish you the very best and continued success. Again, congratulations on this special recognition.

Sincerely,
Diana DeGette
Member of Congress

Pawnote: This original letter is on file at the MaxFund office.

Canines and Cats for Senior and AIDS program

Class

Animal-Related 

Beneficiaries

Aging/Elderly/Senior Citizens
People With AIDS (pwas)

Description

this program is to provide companionship for Seniors and AIDS patients, we provide pets that are vaccinated, altered, and microchipped at no charge. If this person is in a life threating position or needs to go into nursing home, or passes --we always take our animal back and we do not euthnize, we find another home

Photos

Evidence of Program's Success

We continue to receive calls to place animals and thank you from people where the animals have been placed.

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