Greeley Area Habitat for Humanity, Inc. DBA Greeley-Weld Habitat for Humanity

GWHFH is dedicated to eliminating poverty housing so that everyone will have a simple, decent & affordable place to live. Our innovative Construction Management Pathway Program, with Jefferson High School, providing workplace readiness opportunities, for at-risk students while building a home.

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ReStore

Class

Housing 

Beneficiaries

General population

Description

The Greeley-Weld Habitat for Humanity ReStore is a unique self-sustaining nonprofit. Our ReStore profits cover our administrative costs and make it possible for our donor and sponsorships dollars go directly to families in desperate need of homeownership.

Our mission is to RECYCLE donations from individuals and businesses, RESELL them to the public at a reduced cost, and REINVEST the profits into Greeley-Weld Habitat for Humanity to help REBUILD lives through building homes.

The ReStore was started in October of 2005. Each Habitat Restore varies in what they carry. Our ReStore focuses more on the home improvement side of things by taking and selling appliances, furniture, and building materials.

Photos

Evidence of Program's Success

The ReStore consistently exceeds projected net profits. Funds the administrative cost of affliate.

Neighborhood Revitalization

Class

Housing 

Beneficiaries

Adults
Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens
Families
Poor, Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent

Description

Everyone deserves to have safe, functional and affordable housing to thrive in their lives.

Greeley-Weld Habitat for Humanity is seeking to serve the needs in our community and neighborhoods beyond new home construction.

What we do:

Help improve the quality of life in neighborhoods through community and resident partnerships.

How we do it:
1. New home construction
2. Rehabilitation of homes
3. Home repairs
4. Home modifications for older adults

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Evidence of Program's Success

New program

GAHFH Veterans Build

Class

Housing 

Beneficiaries

Adults
Veterans

Description

GWHFH built the first and second Habitat for Humanity Veterans Build in the state of Colorado. The first Veterans Build home was completed in September 2016 and the second completed in September 2017. Two deserving Veteran families now have stability, strength and total self-reliance, through affordable home ownership, for the first time in their family's lives since leaving their military service. GWHFH is proud to partner with our Weld County Veteran community to extend the opportunity of affordable home ownership to those who have given so sacrificially to our country. The third Veterans Build was completed in 2019.

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Evidence of Program's Success

Two deserving Veteran families now have stability, strength and total self-reliance, through affordable home ownership, for the first time in their family's lives since leaving their military service. GWHFH is proud to partner with our Weld County Veteran community to extend the opportunity of affordable home ownership to those who have given so sacrificially to our country. The third Veterans Build is now underway.

Construction Pathway Program (CPP)

Class

Education 

Beneficiaries

Adolescents/Youth (13-19 years)
At-Risk Populations
Parents
Teachers
Unemployed, Underemployed

Description

GWHFH developed, in partnership with Jefferson High School (JHS,) an original and innovative Career to Workplace initiative. This program provides at-risk high school students the opportunity to build a Habitat home from plan design, to building the home, to moving the family in after dedication day. Many of the students core curriculum requirements are incorporated to their every day tasks of building the Habitat home. View our Colorado Gives 2017 video to learn from 50 JHS students the impact this program is having in their lives.

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Evidence of Program's Success

The partnership between Greeley-Weld Habitat for Humanity, Greeley/Evans School District 6, AIMS Community College and our Habitat Partner Families is a truly innovative and successful educational/workforce training initiative moving into its sixth year in the Greeley/Evans area. The Construction Pathway Program (CPP) involves the applied, practical use of required curriculum in a real-world setting. It is an alternative project-based approach to learning; lessons are structured around the naturally occurring steps in designing and building a home. Students apply multiple academic concepts from their curriculum including math and science by hands-on building.

The CPP students are a part of every aspect of the building process, from pouring the foundation to handing the family the keys at the dedication and everything in between. The CPP students through construction skills training on the job site incorporate their core curriculum requirements for high school graduation and Aims Community College into their everyday scope of work with GWHFH. In addition, the students work alongside industry professionals, making valuable connections and having the unique opportunity to learn from, work with and study with professionals from all areas of the building industry and other job sectors. CPP students engage the local community by being a part of the groundbreaking ceremonies and home dedications, working closely with the Habitat family they are building with/for. The students will experience what it means to help those in need, gaining an appreciation for community service and the impact of dedicated philanthropic partnerships. Finally, CPP students experience first-hand the impact the home that they built has in the lives of all the members of the Habitat family and for the greater community.

Underlying social and economic Challenges and the Outcomes the CPP Addresses:

The CPP has proven to be successful in meeting multiple needs throughout the community including, but not limited to, helping to fill much needed trade positions with our graduates and overcoming dropout occurrences. In the course of the last five years, over 375 students have participated in the CPP with marked academic improvement. Students enter into the CPP with an average .8 GPA, behind in credits and lacking in attendance. District 6 reports that students enrolled in the CPP program, not only improve their academic performance but also their attendance rate. The average attendance rate of the CPP students at the beginning of the program is 37% and exiting the program increases to 87%. The CPP is proud to have an 100% graduation rate for its students, while other Jefferson students have an overall graduation rate of 46%. Our students attending Jefferson are facing the severely diminished chance at earning their high school diploma. Contrast that with the CPP students at the conclusion of the program who are in a position where they are graduating with a possibility of 27 dual college credits through AIMS Community College and receiving their high school diploma. This program, now going into its sixth year, is a true and successful display of collaboration and innovation, and what can happen when a community comes together to support its underserved youth.

Furthermore, CPP students learn important soft skills during the construction of the home. They develop skills such as teamwork, dependability, work ethic, construction skills, communication, problem solving, perseverance, and adaptability, among others while concurrently receiving high school credits for their college credit classes.

GWHFH is also a State of Colorado approved P-Tech apprentice partner with District 6 and Aims Community College which offers students opportunities to pursue apprenticeship education and training post-graduation. The CPP will average 25 students onsite each year, and another 150+ in the first and second year leading up to onsite participation. We are currently working with school district 6 and Aims Community College to track future CPP students post graduation to better measure outcomes in higher ed and career placement.

Aims Community Concurrent College Classes Include:

 27 Possible College Credits:
• 6 credits - Basic Construction Certificate
• 4 credits - Applied Technical Math
• 3 credits - Introduction to Carpentry
• 5 credits - Construction Methods Certificate
• 6 credits - Advanced Construction Certificate
• 3 credits - CAD - Revit Architecture
10-hour OSHA Industry Safety Certification

This educational/workforce partnership has been so successful that Greeley-Weld Habitat for Humanity was asked to present our model at the Habitat Global Conference in Atlanta, Georgia in March of 2019 and has since mentored over 15 affiliates throughout the nation in their efforts to launch programs of their own based on the model. Greeley-Weld Habitat for Humanity was just selected as one of 5 Habitat International affiliates who have been awarded funding for our Construction pathway program as part of a HFHI study for youth workforce training programs.

Economic Impact- Innovative Career Pathway Program

Investment into the Construction Pathway not only benefits our students and Habitat Families, but the local economy as well, with our affiliate contributing over 3 million in new construction dollars in 2020 alone and 8.6 million over the last 5 years.

Some of the CPP students continue to post-secondary education at our partner Community College to earn a Construction Management Certificate. Others are quickly employed in the construction industry, many by our trade partners who have had the opportunity to work with the students while in the program. To date, CPP students in the past 5 years have helped build 27 GWHFH homes, across four Weld County communities.

In the process of building homes onsite, CPP students have a rare opportunity to frequently participate in a GWHFH Lunch and Learn opportunities. The Lunch and Learn program offers a shared time for the JHS students to lunch with community volunteers and investors and engage in a Q&A where they learn about numerous career paths, directly from employers. CPP students have at times been offered employment by GWHFH industry partners participating in the Lunch and Learn program. An important outcome for all participants.

Another economic outcome of the CPP is preparing students to enter into the workforce. From the start of the foundation to the completion of the home, these lessons help them as they consider furthering their education or in preparing to enter the workforce. For many students entering the construction sector is a promising path. Trade careers are in high demand with an over 382,000 job shortage in the industry nationwide. *(12/2018, Bureau of Labor Statistics, United States Department of Labor, data.bls.gov).

Not only is the CPP helping underserved youth in our Weld County community achieve a proven pathway to academic success, but it is also providing much needed education, giving young adults the opportunity to find career success in an industry that provides far above cost-of-living wages for skilled tradespeople. It is important to note, however, the primary goal of the CPP is not to channel students into a construction career, but rather expose them to a number of career opportunities beyond high school. Students enrolled in the CPP build confidence in their abilities to work diligently as a team and achieve difficult goals. Student outcomes like enhanced work ethic, team building skills, compassion, dedication and universal commitment to common goals, translates very well to future educational and career success for CPP students.

Home Ownership

Class

Housing 

Beneficiaries

Adults
Families
Females
Males
Poor/Economically Disadvantaged

Description

The family services program is comprised of programs and practices designed to provide applicants and approved homeowners with the skill and support they need to prosper as long-term homeowners. Support services are multifaceted and begin with a consultation with the GWHFH family support committee associate. Approved applicants are paired with a family support committee volunteer who works alongside the partner family throughout the home building and closing processes. Said volunteers work with the partner family to complete a series of six written lessons including: ownership vs. rental occupancy, financial planning, protection of the investment values of the home, homeowner's insurance, equity building and income tax responsibility, and "your mortgage."

Photos

Evidence of Program's Success

Program Impact: A 2016 survey completed by Greeley Habitat homeowners reflects the impact our affordable homeownership program has had on the families we serve. After moving into their home:
o 83% report an increased sense of stability
o 39% report improved overall health
o 70% report increased sense of pride/dignity
o 65% report an improved financial situation
o 74% an increased sense of physical safety
o 30% report an increase in job prospects
o 26% have continued their education
GWHFH has provided proven pathways out of poverty, through affordable homeownership for over 160 low-income families & had only one foreclosure in our 31 years serving Weld County.

Volunteer Program

Class

Housing 

Beneficiaries

Children ages 5 to 21
Disabled, General or Disability unspecified
Families
Poor/Economically Disadvantaged

Description

Volunteer construction labor is one of the primary reasons that Habitat homes are affordable. However, GWHFH employs the use of volunteers in an number of other critical service areas including policy development, in-kind services, floor plan design and modification, retail store operation, family support services, resource development, financial management, and faith relations.

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Evidence of Program's Success

Volunteers continue to be advocates of our Habitat program and mission. On-site volunteers become committee members. A percentage of our committee members become Board members. 2,263 GWHFH volunteers donated 12,440 hours in 2020 to help build 11 Habitat homes for local families and at our ReStore. ReStore volunteers helped rescue over 963,744 pounds of household items and appliances from local landfills.

Key aspects of this profile information have been reviewed by Community First Foundation staff. Each organization is exclusively responsible for the content that appears on the profile page. Community First Foundation offers general guidance as to the purpose of each area but does not require or encourage charities to include anything in particular in each section.