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Denver Botanic Gardens

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Therapeutic Horticulture

Class

Arts, Culture & Humanities 

Beneficiaries

Aging/Elderly/Senior Citizens
Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)
Mentally/Emotionally Disabled
Military/Veterans
Physically Disabled

Description

Therapeutic horticulture is a sensory, plant-­based, outreach and on­-site program for senior adults and those with special needs.

The Gardens offers a number of ways to engage with participants:
Winter Therapeutic Horticulture - Offered November through March, this program comes to your facility, providing a sensory tour of potted plants and a hands-­on activity of your choice.

Summer Therapeutic Horticulture - Come to the York Street gardens mid-­May through September for a tour of the Sensory Garden, an activity of your choice and a plant for each participant to take home.

Horticultural Therapy Services - The Gardens' trained horticultural therapy staff provides consulting services to eligible for­-profit and nonprofit facilities.

SPARK! Cultural Programming for People with Memory Loss - Participants with mild memory loss have the opportunity to enjoy hands-on garden related projects. Classes are the first Wednesday of the month, March through October, and are held at York Street and Chatfield Farms.

Chatfield Farms Veterans Farm Program - This horticulture program supports the vocational, social, physical and therapeutic goals of post-­9/11 military veterans.

Photos

Evidence of Program's Success

Each year, the attendance of therapeutic horticulture programs grow and we have many return visits that greatly enjoy the programs.

Center for Global Initiatives

Class

Environment 

Beneficiaries

Adults
Aging/Elderly/Senior Citizens
Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)
Families
Young Adults (20-25 years)

Description

Formally established in 2012, the vision of the Center for Global Initiatives is to bring international horticultural research and relevance to Denver Botanic Gardens through implementation of diverse and sustainable programs achieving global transformation by connecting people with plants. Horticulturists travel the globe to conduct plant research and to partner with government agencies and municipalities to help new botanic gardens develop.

Photos

Evidence of Program's Success

The Gardens' continues to receive inquiries from botanic gardens and community officials around the globe who would like to benefit from the Gardens' expertise and advice.

Urban Food Initiatives

Class

Food, Agriculture & Nutrition 

Beneficiaries

General Public/Unspecified
Poor/Economically Disadvantaged/Indigent

Description

Denver Botanic Gardens is committed to empowering families in urban areas to make healthy food choices. In an effort to bring fresh local food to our community, Denver Botanic Gardens Chatfield Farms launched the first CSA at a botanic garden in the country in 2010.

Through a partnership with Denver Human Services, the Gardens has expanded outreach to under-served communities through the Urban Food Initiatives program. Fresh produce is sold at DHS offices at discounted prices. Food can be purchased with EBT cards. Please see Denver Botanic Gardens' Urban Food Initiatives website:

http://www.botanicgardens.org/programs/food-programs-and-initiatives

Photos

Evidence of Program's Success

This year Denver Botanic Gardens has initiated 4 farm stands located at all three Denver Human Service offices in the metro area.

Gardens Fund

Class

Arts, Culture & Humanities 

Beneficiaries

General Public/Unspecified

Description

The Gardens Fund Supports all of the programs at Denver Botanic Gardens.

The Gardens has been a favorite destination for more than 65 years. The Gardens is also a living museum accredited by the American Alliance of Museums. Incorporated in 1951, Denver Botanic Gardens has grown to become a truly interdisciplinary center for learning. Horticulture, research, conservation, education and art each plays a role in achieving institutional aims.

Denver Botanic Gardens has three unique locations in Colorado: Denver; Gardens Chatfield Farms in the south suburbs and Mount Goliath, a high-altitude trail and interpretive site on the Mount Evans Scenic Byway.

Nearly 26 percent of the Gardens' visitors come from outside the metro area, pulling from all 50 states and 30 countries.

Photos

Evidence of Program's Success

The four top priorities set forth in the Gardens' new strategic plan are: 1) Vigorously support the passage of SCFD reauthorization; 2) Complete the final projects of the Master Development Plan - three interior gardens (already funded) and the north building to house classrooms, laboratories, exhibit space, library, rare books room and auditorium; 3) Take a leadership role nationally on critical sustainability issues, focusing on water, soils and climate; 4) Develop a strong, measurable and sustainable internal and multi-institutional approach to diversity and outreach.

Exhibits and Interpretation

Class

Arts, Culture & Humanities 

Beneficiaries

Adults
Aging/Elderly/Senior Citizens
Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)
General Public
Young Adults (20-25 years)

Description

The Gardens presents art and science exhibitions throughout the year. An annual outdoor sculpture exhibition takes place at the York St. location, featuring nationally and internationally renowned artists. Art exhibits are occasionally presented at Chatfield Farms. Indoor art and science exhibitions also take place at York St. The art and exhibits department also manages the School of Botanical Art and Illustration.

Photos

Evidence of Program's Success

The Gardens' presents annual summer outdoor sculpture exhibitions including the hugely Chihuly (2014), Alexander Calder (2017), Deborah Butterfield (2015), Alan Houser (2011) and Henry Moore (2010). Indoor art exhibits are presented year-round by local and regional artists.

Research and Conservation

Class

Environment 

Beneficiaries

Adults
General Public

Description

Denver Botanic Gardens makes a significant contribution to native plant conservation by monitoring species native to Colorado. The Gardens' ultimate goal is to reverse the degradation and decline of native flora through conservation, experimentation, and the dissemination of knowledge. Research Department efforts include population monitoring, seed collection, managing living ex-situ collections, habitat restoration, rare plant reintroductions and the ecology of invasive species. The Gardens also maintains the Kathryn Kalmbach Herbarium of Vascular Plants (KHD) and Sam Mitchel Herbarium of Fungi. Herbarium staff work to build and maintain a comprehensive, well-curated collection of Colorado's vascular plants and mushrooms for the purpose of preservation and study. Staff members are available to identify plants for the public.

Photos

Evidence of Program's Success

The Sam Mitchel Herbarium of Fungi was named in 2010 to honor long time volunteer, Dr. D.H. "Sam" Mitchell. The Gardens has a new Conservation Genetics Program initiated through the generous funding of the Gladys Cheeman Evans Endowment. This program will accompany and enhance the existing rare plant monitoring, habitat restoration and invasive species research. It is the first to focus solely on plants found in the Rocky Mountain region, allowing the Gardens' research to directly impact conservation decisions about those species.

Demographic data collected by DBG's Research Department over more than 15 years contributed to the decision by the US Fish & Wildlife Service to list the skiffmilkvetch (Astragalus microcymbus) as a candidate for protection under the Endangered Species Act: There are 12 species of plants in Colorado listed as threatened or endangered under the Endangered Species Act. We were able to collect seed of 4 of them in 2010. DBG also collected seed of an
additional 4 rare species in Colorado.DBG published two manuals guiding re-vegetation after the removal of Tamarisk along waterways in the southwestern U.S.

Through our Kathryn Kalmbach Herbarium, DBG initiated or completed 3 large-scale floristic inventory projects. These projects document the flora in a Colorado region throughout the growing season. DBG added more than 700 accessions to our herbarium through this work.

The volunteer program Rare Plant Monitoring Stewards contributed more than 1100 hours last year to rare plant conservation in Colorado. Data collected by stewards had major impacts on both research and conservation through scouting seed collection locations, documenting populations of rare plants, conducting ecological-niche modeling and assisting in demographic monitoring and tissue collection for genetic analysis.

Education

Class

Environment 

Beneficiaries

Adults
Families
Teachers
Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens
People/Families with of People with Disabilities

Description

Denver Botanic Gardens offers a broad range of educational opportunities for all ages, including programs for adults, children, families, the aging and people with special needs or disabilities. Participants can choose from certificate and non-certificate interactive classes, lectures and programs for professional development or personal enrichment. All activities share new ways to interpret and experience the connection and wonders of people and plants. Among the opportunities: Seedlings preschool classes, Cultivation Cruiser public school outreach, on-site guided tours, Plant Discovery Days, K-12 teacher training and workshops such as those about gardening, sustainability, art, photography, herbs, and more.

Photos

Evidence of Program's Success

1) Cultivation Cruiser brings plants and hands-on curriculum support to teachers in the seven-county Denver Metropolitan Area, reaching approximately 6,000 students in 2009, 2) DBG's Botanical Illustration Certificate Program is one of only five in the world, and 3) Guided school programs service over 21,000 students each year.

DBG expanded class and programs offering for adults, reaching an increased audience of over 8,612 registrants. More than 536 school programs were delivered, serving about 21,899 school children. Of those, 6,686 children were served by the Garden's In Full Bloom Scholarship Program providing free or partial funding for children in low income schools (defined as having 60% or more participation in the National Free and Reduced Lunch Program.)

The Gardens worked with 18 classrooms in six low-income schools through the Growing Scientists (Growing Respect by Observing our World) Collaborative, an integrated effort between the Children's Museum of Denver, the Butterfly Pavilion and Denver Botanic Gardens. This Collaborative is a multifaceted program that includes comprehensive teacher professional development and curriculum support, literacy and science materials, in-class educational programming and field trips in alignment with the Denver Public Schools and Adams 12 Five Star School District's life science curriculum.

DBG's Education programs reached over 21,899 children total, serving up hands-on experiences,standards-based science lessons and the marvels of the plant world.

Simultaneously the Gardens is working to build on the unprecedented growth of our adult-audience programs and are attracting interesting and influential speakers and presenters. These programs provide experiences that exemplify the Gardens' four core values: transformation, diversity, sustainability and relevance.

Horticulture

Class

Environment 

Beneficiaries

General Public
General Public/Unspecified

Description

Denver Botanic Gardens presents a wide range of display gardens; living and preserved collections that illustrate the connection between plants and people. Diverse collections feature plants from the tropics to the tundra. Specific gardens such as Western Panoramas, Sacred Earth, Dryland Mesa, and Wildflower Treasures focus on regional themes and strengthen our Western identity. The Roads Water-Smart Garden serves as a drought-tolerant gardening model showcasing native and adapted plants that thrive in Western gardens with year-round interest. At the Gardens the traditions of European horticulture merge with a dynamic variety of plants and design that represent the best in horticultural achievement. Other gardens like the Japanese Garden, Plant Asia and South African Plaza feature non-European gardening cultures. At the York Street site alone, horticulturists maintain over 23,000 species of plants in 45 gardens.

Photos

Evidence of Program's Success

The Gardens' collaborative Plant Select

Denver Botanic Gardens Chatfield Farms

Class

Environment 

Beneficiaries

General Public

Description

Denver Botanic Gardens Chatfield Farms is a picturesque native plant preserve among the grasslands, ponds and cottonwood banks of Deer Creek. Facilities include nature trails, a wildlife observation area, a Community Supported Agriculture farm site, a historical homestead, display gardens, educational exhibits and picnic areas. Whether exploring the wetlands, riparian area or historical farm, students and guests walk away with a newfound appreciation for life and the natural world that surrounds them. Walk along the scenic trails any time of year, the landscape is always changing. Seasonal special events take place throughout the year including Lavender Festival, Corn Maze, Pumpkin Festival and Santa's Village.

Photos

Evidence of Program's Success

The Gardens' Research Department utilized enthusiastic volunteers to study methods to best remove invasive grasses from Chatfield Farms. Crop acreage has been expanded and the native plant garden was installed in May 2010. Plans are currently being made to further develop education and interpretation opportunities at the site, including use of the Gardens' new cell phone audio tour program.

In 2015, Chatfield Farms received a grant from Kaiser Permanente to expand its reach with the Urban Food Initiative and help food desert communities access fresh produce.

In 2014, a grant from The Colorado Fresh Food Financing Fund (CO4F) allowed the purchase of a refrigerated, commercial -grade truck to transport produce from the farm to pop-up produce markets in underserved communities.

In the fall of 2011 Denver Botanic Gardens opened its Visitors Center at Chatfield. The new Visitors Center greets guests and orients Chatfield visitors to the many offerings of its 750 acres in order to enhance their experience.

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