Colorado Wildlife Federation

WE DO WHAT WE DO SO YOU CAN DO WHAT YOU LOVE! If you love to fish, hike, photograph wildlife, bird watch, camp or hunt including preserving the habitat that makes all of this possible in the state of Colorado, then you've come to the right place! Donate now or go to Programs page to learn more!

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Becoming an Outdoors Woman (BOW)

Class

Education 

Beneficiaries

Female Adults
Outdoor Recreationists
Wildlife Enthusiasts

Description

CWF began hosing this nationally popular Becoming an Outdoors Woman (BOW) program here in Colorado beginning in 2017. We offer quarterly one-day programs and the 3-day workshop. The 2018 3-day workshop was held at Colorado State University Mountain Campus (Pingree Park), Fort Collins July 27-29. It was a wonderful experience, as reflected by the outstanding evaluations. Our snowshoeing day was held in early March We also featured an event at Colorado Clays June 24. The 2019 WEEKEND RETREAT WILL BE HELD JULY 12-14 again at Colorado State University Mountain Campus.
We also offer scholarships to our programs from raffle proceeds at BOW events. In the 3-day workshop, women learn an array of outdoors skills they choose from a menu of outdoor classes over a weekend. (We also offer day classes.) Examples are: wilderness safety, fly-tying, nature/wildlife photography, great meals for outdoor camping, archery, etc.

Photos

Evidence of Program's Success

CWF began offering the program in 2017 [but has been very popular in 38 states and 6 provinces]. In 2017 CWF offered a June 4 class and October 15 class on clay/trap skeet shooting that was fully subscribed. The August 25-27, 2017 workshop was followed by very favorable evaluations from both instructors and the participants. In 2018 we held a snowshoeing day in early March that was sold out. We also held another day event at Colorado Clays on June 24. We look forward to the weekend event at CSU's Mountain Campus (Pingree ParK) July 27 - 29.

Certified Garden Habitats

Class

Animal-Related 

Beneficiaries

Animals
Families
Wildlife Enthusiasts

Description

Colorado is partnering with National Wildlife Federation to help families work to certify their gardens as bird/butterfly/wildlife habitat. To do so, the site must have shade, native plants, a water source, and a place to rear young. For example, monarch butterflies require native milkweed to lay their eggs. Colorado has 4 native types of milkweed. For information go to coloradowildlife.org and click on Habitat tab at the top of homepage. Note that the City of Denver registered to become a community habitat. That means if you live there and certify your garden it will count toward Denver's points needed to become a certified community habitat.

Photos

Evidence of Program's Success

Number of certifications

Keep Public Lands Public: Protect Fish and Wildlife Habitat

Class

Animal-Related 

Beneficiaries

Adults
Animals
General Public
Wildlife Enthusiasts
Families

Description

CWF and NWF believe long-term economic and ecological health of our communities depends upon conserving the natural habitats that support fish and wildlife and tourism. Local communities must be involved in shaping their region's future. NWF works in the Rocky Mountain region, and CWF in Colorado, to promote and achieve -- and maintain --a balanced course that safeguards wildlife. We focus on public lands managed by BLM and US Forest Service. Migration corridors for wildlife movement between winter and summer ranges are essential. We are working to safeguard particular corridors in the state.
Here is our view of the situation in Colorado: We link these four facts: First, Colorado's population is projected to increase from 5.6MM today to 10.3 MM by 2050. Second, according to the State of the Rockies poll, 84% of voters cite as one of the reasons for living in Colorado, the ability to live near, recreate on and enjoy public lands like national parks and forests. 96% said they have visited public lands managed by federal agencies in the last year. Third, outdoor recreation already contributes $62.5 B annually to Colorado's economy. Fourth, Colorado's unparalleled wildlife resource needs suitable habitat. Therefore, presuming Coloradans of the year 2040 will live in Colorado and tourists will visit here in part for our fantastic outdoor recreation opportunities, we absolutely need to hang onto our public lands! CWF must and will remain steadfast in safeguarding our public lands in Colorado.
We:
-- Support wise planning and development decisions by ensuring that wildlife is fully considered in plans and decisions -- this means wildlife population status and objectives, movement and migration patterns, habitats and threats.
--Foster robust local engagement in public comment processes. CWF and NWF facilitate inclusion of credible conservation voices in these dialogues, including wildlife viewers, birders, sportsmen and others.
--Identify and implement high priority habitat projects, working with an array of diverse partners.
--Conduct outreach through media that demonstrate to federal, state and local decision makers that local opinions support conservation.
See examples of recent land designation successes below under Long Term Successes.

Photos

Evidence of Program's Success

Successes in protecting important wildlife habitats on specific public lands in Colorado that are managed by BLM and by US Forest Service. For current progress and status re public lands in South Park managed by BLM and wildlife connectivity and migration corridors work in Upper Rio Grande area, see CWF website.

Environmental Education Program

Class

Animal-Related 

Beneficiaries

Adults
Animals
Children ages 5 to 21
Families
Wildlife Enthusiasts

Description

CWF conducts education programs at events during the year. CWF partners with NWF to distribute the award-winning Ranger Rick publications.

CWF conducts educational sessions for the public and garden clubs who wish to learn more about nature plants that attract butterflies and bees for their backyards. Those with serious interest may certify their backyard habitats through NWF's certification program.


Photos

Evidence of Program's Success

Number of families touched by the programs at events during the year
Number of Ranger Rick magazines distributed
Excellent reviews

CWF's Student Chapter's work: constructing fishing line recycle containers; removing invasive weeds + restore habitat

Class

Animal-Related 

Beneficiaries

Adults
Animals
Families
Outdoor Recreationists
Wildlife Enthusiasts

Description


2016-2017: CWF's student chapter at Metro State University of Denver constructed 24 fishing line recycle containers. We prepared signage for the containers to recognize the generous donors: Gary and Kyle Sanders of the George T. Sanders Company and The Home Depot. The containers are designed to help anglers dispose of spent fishing line and to prevent waterfowl from becoming entangled. Eight were placed at popular fishing spots in Denver through Denver Parks and Recreation.

2015:The student chapter members also have spent many on-the-ground project days to remove invasive weeds, such as russian olive, that harm native habitat that wildlife need for forage.
They also collected native seeds at Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge - rabbit brush and four-winged saltbush.
The students weed the green roof on the campus of Metro State.
They recently inventoried species at Chatfield State Park to furnish to government agencies.

2014-2015: During the late spring and summer months, the students monitor bluebird nest boxes on Jefferson County Open Space in and report the data. They also have built 24 bat boxes. In addition, the students manage CWF's educational booth at the Bighorn Sheep Fest in Georgetown in November. The chapter was founded by CWF board member Ashley Rust in February 2013. See photos under Multimedia.

Photos

Evidence of Program's Success

Thriving native shrubs, plants, grasses in the area where the invasive weeds have been removed and monitored

Shores that are clear of used fishing lines in areas where the fishing line recycle containers are installed

South Park

Class

Environment 

Beneficiaries

Animals
Families
General Public
Outdoor Recreationists

Description

Prevent harm to beautiful South Park's intact wildlife habitat, streams, vistas and water quality. South Park supplies a significant amount of Denver and Aurora's drinking water. This iconic grassland basin also enjoys a Congressional designation as a National Heritage Area. Fisherman from all over the country value the gold medal streams in South Park. South Park is less than a 2-hour drive from the metro area and attracts large numbers of Colorado outdoor recreationists and tourists. CWF had requested BLM to undertake a landscape level planning process for the public lands it manages in this iconic area back in 2011. The request was granted in 2013. [If the request had not been granted, South Park would have been lumped together with BLM lands elsewhere in eastern Colorado for planning.]
Latest action: BLM is well into the planning process. We believe that the large coalition including Park County has done such good hard work to forge practical land use solutions for the BLM-managed public lands there that the substance will be intact. We shall remain actively pushing for this common sense outcome. The formal planning process began on June 1, 2015. This means developing a long term plan that balances the diverse interests including protecting important wildlife habitat, the watershed and streams, vistas and recreation, as it considers areas appropriate and inappropriate for future oil and gas leasing. Note that South Park watershed also supplies much drinking water to the Front Range. CWF has worked nonstop, joined by National Wildlife Federation, community leaders and the County, for the past six years to protect South Park. We are working to identify and build common ground among diverse interests for protection of these resource values.
We are hopeful that the recommendations developed by the community, County, CWF, NWF, water providers and other diverse interests will appear intact as the preferred alternative in BLM's draft that is expected in late 2018.

For next steps during this planing process, contact CWF for information.

Photos

Evidence of Program's Success

CWF had applied to BLM in 2011 for landscape level planning for public lands managed by BLM in South Park. BLM agreed in 2013 and the process began June 1, 2015. The process remains underway and we are expecting BLM to issue its draft plan in late summer (2018). Community support (many residents, the County and town councils) has been essential and widespread. We have worked effectively to build collaboration among stakeholders beginning in 2014 to achieve common ground for making specific recommendations to BLM for safeguarding water, wildlife, recreation and quality of life.
Collaboration with BLM among the County, community, land management agencies, water providers, Colorado Parks and Wildlife, and nonprofits including CWF, NWF and TU has continued to date as the process proceeds. So far, so good! We all are hopeful that good working relationships will result that help generate an effective outcome for the future of South Park at the end of the process one or two years from now.
For specific information, please call CWF directly.

Protect Colorado's Wildlife Species of Greatest Conservation Need

Class

Animal-Related 

Beneficiaries

Animals
Families
General Public
Outdoor Recreationists
Wildlife Enthusiasts

Description

CWF works on projects throughout the State to protect important wildlife habitat, especially on public lands. Often, we lead or participate in coalitions, a very effective approach. In addition to the examples referenced under the program, Keep Public Lands Public, here are additional examples of the numerous projects:
--CWF continues to work to gain full, dedicated, permanent funding for the Land and Water Conservation Fund. Created in 1965, it is a tool that has conserved some of Colorado's and the West's most important fish and wildlife habitat and public access. It is funded using a small fraction of royalties from offshore drilling, not taxpayer dollars.
--CWF is building a coalition in Colorado in conjunction with other states to result in dedication of a small fraction of royalties from offshore drilling- not taxpayer dollars - to help species in greatest conservation need. Colorado Parks and Wildlife lists 55"tier 1" species of fish and wildlife as species of greater conservation need in Colorado in the Colorado State Wildlife Action Plan. A bipartisan bill was introduced in Congress in December 2017 and its support continues to build. There are now 110 co-sponsors of the House bill. See our website for more information and updates: coloradowildlife.org. Species of greatest conservation need include greater sage grouse, golden eagle, our state fish - the greenback cutthroat trout, and mountain plover.

Photos

Evidence of Program's Success

A bipartisan bill was introduced in Congress in December 2017 to create a dedicated fund from offshore drilling royalties to address species of greatest conservation need. The Colorado Parks and Wildlife Commission passed a resolution in support on 8/12/16.
Support for the bill continues to build. Colorado Parks and Wildlife would receive $29 million annually if the bill succeeds and a dedicated fund is created to conserve these species whose populations are decreasing markedly.

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